Space Harrier 2 - Grandslam

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By Tolvatar

Paladin (975)

Tolvatar's picture

28-05-2020, 23:38

CASDuino wrote:

It's the same thing except one is powered by the cart slot, the other is powered by a usb cable or DC adapter. both load via the cassette port.

TZXDuino was originally for Spectrum as was the TZX format that the TSX file format has been added too.

You're right.
I prefer the one to the cartridge slot cause looks more MSX world and i hace one power cord less.
With two little childs, the less cords, the best

By Manuel

Ascended (16641)

Manuel's picture

29-05-2020, 00:30

Tolvatar wrote:

There's no way to get 2 identical wav files from the same Game. But you already know this.
Spectrum community agree with the advantages of tzx format to get perfect dumps from tapes.
The openmsx team no. Why? This is another story...
No problem

OK, I shouldn't have responded to this with my 'summary'. I regret that. It was not the right summary, as Nataliapc said. I just reread the whole Pull Request thread at https://github.com/openMSX/openMSX/issues/1076 and everything there is to say is there.

As to what you wrote Tolvatar: as there are no 2 identical wavs from the same game, there will also be likely not 2 identical TSX files from the same game, as the timing is slightly different and the format is fine grained enough to record that. Nataliapc explained it clearly in the Pull Request thread.

The format doesn't make the perfect dumps. It only makes them available. The raw dumps need to be made by someone who knows what he's doing in order to not destroy the data in it. The resulting WAV file (or whatever digital audio file format is used) is to be processed by a smart tool that may also require user interaction (as explained by Nataliapc). This tool can be used to make TSX files, or even cleaned up WAV files or whatever you like. The tool helps to clean up issues in the original recording and makes the 'perfect'.
As for preservation, also nataliapc agreed that keeping the original WAV file for real preservation is a must.

Anyway, this is just repeating things from the Pull Request discussion. Really, everything has been said there. No need to redo the discussion here. I won't go into the same arguments again from now on.

So, let's think forward.

What is new since then?

Most important thing for me is that in the meantime, there are many more TSX files (385 if I understood the website correctly) than 3 years ago. That changed.

What also changed (at least to me), is that I realized that the issues people have with WAVs in openMSX are just because these WAVs are bad. They are bad dumps and also don't load on a real MSX. This also illustrates an advantage of a format like TSX: people who know what they're doing have done their job and took a lot of effort to extract the actual data from the wav. Finding such files in the wild will give you a much more likely working MSX program than a raw WAV file.

Also new is that nowadays the really interesting tool, makeTSX, is available on GitHub. It wasn't back then.

What else is new?

By tfh

Prophet (2262)

tfh's picture

29-05-2020, 09:02

Manuel wrote:

There are many more TSX files (385 if I understood the website correctly) than 3 years ago. That changed.
What else is new?

Well, make that 392. The abovementioned website is not the only source of .TSX files. That has also changed. Can't post any links here, but you can make some decent guesses.

By mars2000you

Enlighted (5630)

mars2000you's picture

29-05-2020, 09:47

I am wondering if there is a TSXS2CAS tool. Maybe it's only possible by converting first into a WAV file, then the WAV file into a CAS file.

Or maybe just by removing the 3 or 4 first blocks of a TSX file???

By araubi

Champion (431)

araubi's picture

29-05-2020, 09:50

mars2000you wrote:

I am wondering if there is a TSXS2CAS tool. Maybe it's only possible by converting first into a WAV file, then the WAV file into a CAS file.

Or maybe just by removing the 4 first blocks of a TSX file???

Well... I use TAPE2CAS and the fork of OpenMSX: OPENMSX_TSX. This way, I don't need to convert from TSX to WAV. Conversion takes a few seconds by pressing F9.

By mars2000you

Enlighted (5630)

mars2000you's picture

29-05-2020, 09:56

Thanks for the answer. Anyway I prefer to use blueMSX that has direct support for CAS files (without internal WAV conversion or need to use a TCL script).

By nataliapc

Expert (88)

nataliapc's picture

29-05-2020, 13:27

araubi wrote:

Well... I use TAPE2CAS and the fork of OpenMSX: OPENMSX_TSX. This way, I don't need to convert from TSX to WAV. Conversion takes a few seconds by pressing F9.

There is available the TAPE2CAS source code?
It could be very easy to create a TSX2CAS using the same patching process...
The best of this is that we could ensure that the input data is reliable.

By nataliapc

Expert (88)

nataliapc's picture

29-05-2020, 13:33

Manuel wrote:

What else is new?

Thanks for your words Manuel.

Also could be new the TSX support for the SVI 3x8 tape format.
The SVI 3x8 community can undertake a task of preservation too instead of the use of the current SVI-CAS files.
This is done using the same new #4B block (KCS) than MSX standard blocks are using but with a different header.

By Manuel

Ascended (16641)

Manuel's picture

29-05-2020, 13:44

Ah, good to know that, nataliapc. Thanks!

Mars: the problem of TSX to CAS is that it only works for very standard blocks, unless you do patching, as nataliapc said. It's a limitation of the CAS format. For standard blocks, I guess it is indeed possible to directly copy a large part of the data into the CAS file. Correct, nataliapc?

By mars2000you

Enlighted (5630)

mars2000you's picture

29-05-2020, 13:52

nataliapc wrote:

There is available the TAPE2CAS source code?
It could be very easy to create a TSX2CAS using the same patching process...
The best of this is that we could ensure that the input data is reliable.

The source is included. Check here: https://www.msx.org/downloads/utilities/tape/tape2cas

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